Tag Archives: internet

Does Anyone Really Need Cable Now?

Depending on where you live, you may have personal accounts related to poor customer service received from your cable provider, that range from minor inconveniences to major complications. I too, have a few horror stories. Although cable dominates, more and more consumers are cutting the cords that bind, myself included. I ditched cable in 2011 after I became fed up with the high price of receiving nothing. I traded my frustrations in and bought a Roku. For the one time price of $99, I immediately went from mad at the ridiculous bills and poor customer service, to excited and able to watch television as much or as little as I wanted to. I subscribe to Netflix, HuluPlus and I have access to several other options for no additional cost, including, but not limited to, Lifetime (the movies, series and reality shows), History Channel (Vikings and the documentaries), all the shows I love that air on NBC, ABC, FOX and dozens of other networks on cable. I can’t possibly watch all of the options available to me because the choices are so extensive.

Since the introduction of Roku into my life, Chromecast and Amazon Fire have entered the market giving consumers additional options for our entertainment. All you need to rid yourself of any issues you have with your cable provider is access to the internet. Yet, people are still needlessly suffering from cable. Even HBO (has finally) realized how much money they have been losing by offering their programming exclusively through cable providers and beginning this year they are starting their subscription platform (which needs to be made available on Roku, Chromecast and Amazon Fire after the 3 month Apple test run is concluded. Just my opinion if someone from HBO happens to read this. Otherwise, HBO will not have grasped the entire purpose of the subscription platform at all), with the monthly price of $14.99; which is still reasonable when compared to the cost of cable. For those who don’t want to buy devices that connect to your televisions, several national and cable networks offer their programs for free viewing directly on their website.

Did you know that there are thousands of households that have cable, but many of those same households don’t have internet? Knowing this I often ask myselfwhy?

Internet is less expensive and more important than having cable, in my opinion. As I just indicated, you can watch television with an internet connection. And with so many options for online content being developed in various genres, having access to the internet provides nearly endless access to information. Also, if you have children in your life between the ages of 5 and 25, they are likely using the internet to do their homework, learn languages and learning how to use smart devices better than you are. They can’t do that with cable. Businesses, such as Super Woman Productions and Publishing, operate online using the internet. I couldn’t connect with nearly as many people using cable as I’m able to do on a daily basis using the internet. The internet has literally turned people into millionaires in moments, while cable has only made a select number of individuals wealthy.

Keep in mind that I’m not sharing this information in exchange for anything. I believe in sharing knowledge that I have acquired with others and if you follow me on social media, you are aware of that. But if you want to sign up for HuluPlus, click this link and you’ll receive 2 weeks of unlimited viewing for freeIf you don’t love it, or find it to be convenient to use, don’t keep it. Test out other platforms at your leisure and find out what you like and what you don’t. I’m sure you will find at least one that can help release you from the bonds of cable and free up some of your income to save for something else you’d rather do. I happen to use the money I save on vacations.

Google, We Have A Problem

There seems to be a tragic misunderstanding of what makes a person or entity relevant on the internet. If you are an artist, a business owner, a musician or a magazine publisher there’s the expectation that you should be found one specific place on the internet so that you can be booked, called or contacted. That place is not Twitter or Facebook. It’s so simple, even a two-year old could do it. It’s called Google. Yes, Google. Twitter and Facebook require that a person sign up and create an account to obtain your information. Everyone doesn’t want to become a follower or a friend in order for them to locate your store, buy your album, magazine or services. Do you realize how much you are limiting yourself, simply by NOT having a website? If you aren’t sure, think about the last time you got a call from someone who said “I saw you on Twitter today, and I wanted to know if I can buy ___.” If that’s happening to you regularly just from your tweets, then by all means, carry on. But if you’re not getting that call, you’re not as relevant as you think you are, even if you’ve hit record numbers of followers.

It doesn’t matter how many fans you have. Some of your fans aren’t as active on Twitter or Facebook as you think they are. They may actually only view your timeline or news feed once a month because that’s how often they sign on to look at their own Twitter and Facebook accounts {Side note: some of your fans are also stalkers or looky-lous and they won’t result in any profits}. Even with the increased use in smart phones, social networking is still limiting the way in which people can locate you. A fan is one thing, a consumer is something completely different. When you’re in business, which one is more important to you? A fan who becomes a consumer will buy more than your mp3 from iTunes. 

I recently pulled out some business cards people gave me and Googled all of the companies. I was utterly amazed at how many business entities, artists, singers and creatives I couldn’t find on the internet outside of Facebook and Twitter. Do all these companies and individuals want to be a secret? Do they want to make money? Do they want people to know their tour dates, office hours, and any other important information that consumers look for? You can’t even find a phone number for them to call and ask them “What is your website?” I’m going to share a business secret with you now. Smart consumers like to do a little research before they get into their cars and drive somewhere. If you operate a business, consumers may actually look for your business address online before venturing out to buy your products. However, if you don’t have a website, you prevent that from happening. And every business doesn’t have a store or static business location. Therefore, if your business is done in a nontraditional office or storefront location, being accessible online becomes even more crucial to your success.

Recently someone on Twitter sent me a link saying “how to become #1 on Google“. I replied and told them (not bragging) that I’m already #1 on Google. How do I know? I learned how to accomplish that a couple of years ago at a technology conference I attended. Unfortunately, I was one of five people of color in attendance at the conference and we were all women. I periodically Google myself [typing s u p e r w o m a n p r o d u c t i o n s]. I type it different ways and even misspell it intentionally sometimes, just to see what others might find if they do the same. My website is the first result, is listed on the first seven pages of Google results consistently and then I remain in the results up until around page thirteen. Don’t believe me? I challenge you to prove me wrong. I’ve even been re-blogged and reposted in other languages. I’m in business directories that I didn’t even know I was in. I had to tell the editor of one business directory to change their listing because they incorrectly listed my business at an address in Troy, Michigan instead of Detroit.  

I don’t know how people do it. By it I mean not exist on the internet outside of social networking sites. It’s a lot easier to co-exist within the confines of social networking than it is to be completely reliant upon it. Does anyone remember MySpace? One minute it was the hottest thing in existence. Now anyone who’s still using it exclusively needs to be put into a time machine and brought into 2012 at the speed of light. The changes that Facebook is constantly making are an attempt to remain on top of the social networking pyramid because it’s hard to be king. They are not making the changes for you. Twitter is… well, #trending, for lack of a better word. It’s fun, but you’re still limited to providing information in 140 or less characters. It can be argued that smart people can say a lot in 140 characters, but it can also be said that not being able to spell out words makes even the smartest person look stupid on Twitter.

So as an entrepreneur, I encourage anyone who calls themselves the same or sells a product or service to increase your audience outside of the constraints of social networking sites and establish a website for yourself, your products and business. If you feel like the financial investment isn’t truly worth the costs associated with establishing a real web presence, you are not serious about being in business. All serious business owners know that it takes money (time, energy and committment) to make money. And if you need help, I have a great website designer that I can refer you to. He helps keep me #1 on Google.